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Carter Named Chief Diversity Officer for Greenville University

image of Terrell CarterTerrell Carter, adjunct instructor at St. Louis Community College, has been named vice president and chief diversity officer for Greenville University.

Carter joins the university from Central Baptist Theological Seminary, where he served as the director of contextualized learning and an assistant professor of practical theology. He begins his duties June 1.

As chief diversity officer, he will lead the development and implementation of a comprehensive diversity plan for the institution. He also will work with faculty, staff and students to champion the importance of diversity and inclusion within the university’s culture.

Carter brings 16 years of teaching and academic administration experience to this position. In addition, he is a theologist, a senior pastor in his church, an artist, an author and a former police officer.

The foundation for Carter’s career was laid in 1993 when he was a student at the Forest Park campus. Since that time, he has earned a bachelor’s degree with a double major in biblical studies and organizational leadership, a Master of Fine Arts with a concentration in arts management and leadership, a Doctor of Theology and a Doctor of Ministry.

“My most long-standing mentors have been the professors who planted seeds in my life as a student at STLCC,” he said. “My first teaching position, which was for the college, actually came about because of one of those mentors. They taught me to dream big, value relationships, look for the good in others and challenge people to rise to their highest level.”

Carter said his decision to apply for the position at Greenville University was twofold.

“I applied because it seemed to fit not only my diverse academic and work history, but my hope to participate in college-level administration,” he said. “And, more importantly, as a person of faith, the position addresses my personal desire to recognize the intrinsic value and various contributions that people from diverse backgrounds can make when they are invited to participate in an educational process.”

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